• Joseph S. Sollers
    1987

    Joseph S. Sollers

    Johns Hopkins University

    Joseph S. Sollers

    Johns Hopkins University

    Joesph S. Sollers, Jr., a four-time All-Maryland goalie at Boys Latin from 1943-1947, enlisted in the Navy as a junior in high school and served 18 months before returning to graduate from Boys Latin in 1947. In 1945, Sollers was honored as the first recipient of the C. Markland Kelly High School Award for the outstanding high school player. Sollers was a three-time All-American at Johns Hopkins from 1949-1951, playing on the 1949 co-championship team and the 1950 championship team. He is the only player ever to receive the Kelly Award as the top collegiate goalie and the Schmeisser Trophy as the nations outstanding defensive player in the same year, 1951. Sollers was co-captain for the South in the 1951 North/South Collegiate All-Star game and is considered to be one of Hopkins' all-time great goalkeepers. Sollers' contributions to lacrosse are visible at every game and practice today. As co-inventor of STX, the plastic stick patented in 1970, he was instrumental in revolutionizing the game of lacrosse. Joe Sollers passed away in 1995.

  • Robert G. Merrick
    1987

    Robert G. Merrick

    Yale University

    Robert G. Merrick

    Yale University

    Bob Merrick's association with lacrosse began at Gilman School in Baltimore where he won championships in 1949 and 1950, as well as a second team All-Maryland selection in 1950. As a four-year varsity player at Yale, where he won division championships in 1952, 1953 and 1954, Merrick earned All-New England honors three times. He started for the winning North team in the 1954 North/South Collegiate All-Star Game. Merrick was a three time club all-star while playing for Mt. Washington for six years, winning national club championships in 1958, 1959, 1960 and 1962. In 1965 and 1966, he was an assistant coach for Mt. Washington, and represented the USA as a player in the 1967 World Championship. As chairman of the All-American selection committee from 1967-1985, Merrick developed the modern selection process for the nation's top collegiate lacrosse players. A former director of the Lacrosse Foundation, Merrick received the Gelston award in 1980 and the USILA Man-of-the-Year Award in 1982. Bob Merrick passed away in 1990.

  • Henry E. Fish
    1987

    Henry E. Fish

    Princeton University

    Henry E. Fish

    Princeton University

    Although having never seen a lacrosse stick until age 16, when he arrived at Phillips Exeter Academy, Fish became a two-year varsity midfielder at Exeter and was selected All-Club in 1942. As team captain in 1943, Fish helped Exeter to capture the New England League championship that year. After serving in the U.S. Navy from 1943-44, Fish attended Princeton University where he was a three-time varsity midfielder and face-off man. One of the most dominant college players of his time, he earned first team All-America honors in 1947 and 1948, and was selected second team All-American in 1946. Fish was also selected as captain of the 1947 Princeton team. Fish was chosen to participate as a midfielder in the North/South Collegiate All-Star game, and selected to the All-North teams in 1946, 1947 and 1948. Also a great skier, Fish earned the world renown "Golden Snow Star" award in 1971 for climbing and skiing 50 mountain trails and slopes in Kitzbuhel, Austria. At that time, only 10 other Americans had achieved this coveted award. Henry Fish passed away in February, 2016.

  • Joseph R. Wilder
    1986

    Joseph R. Wilder

    Dartmouth College

    Joseph R. Wilder

    Dartmouth College

    Wilder was an All-Maryland selection on three Baltimore City College secondary school championship teams in the late 1930's. He went on to Dartmouth College where he became a first team All-American and a two-time North-South Collegiate All-Star participant. From 1940 to 1942 Wilder led Dartmouth to three straight New England titles. During this time he also led the league in scoring, and was selected to the All-New England Team three straight years. In 1954 Wilder was the recipient of one of the most coveted awards in American medicine, the Markel Award, based on potential as a surgeon and teacher. Wilder played four years of club lacrosse while attending medical school. He was Professor of Surgery and the Director of Surgery, Emergency and Outpatient Services at New York's Mount Sinai Medical Center. Wilder served as Chief of Surgery for the US Air Force, and was a Professor of Surgery. He was a world renowned sports artist and his images have been reproduced on 38 magazine covers. He wrote 4 critically acclaimed books - 2 on Surgery and 2 on Art. He was also an inventor with 9 patents primarily involving surgical instruments and light tubes. Joe Wilder passed away in 2003.

    Wilder was an All-Maryland selection on three Baltimore City College secondary school championship teams in the late 1930's. He went on to Dartmouth College where he became a first team All-American and a two-time North-South Collegiate All-Star participant. From 1940 to 1942 Wilder led Dartmouth to three straight New England titles. During this time he also led the league in scoring, and was selected to the All-New England Team three straight years. In 1954 Wilder was the recipient of one of the most coveted awards in American medicine, the Markel Award, based on potential as a surgeon and teacher. Wilder played four years of club lacrosse while attending medical school. He was Professor of Surgery and the Director of Surgery, Emergency and Outpatient Services at New York's Mount Sinai Medical Center. Wilder served as Chief of Surgery for the US Air Force, and was a Professor of Surgery. He was a world renowned sports artist and his images have been reproduced on 38 magazine covers. He wrote 4 critically acclaimed books - 2 on Surgery and 2 on Art. He was also an inventor with 9 patents primarily involving surgical instruments and light tubes. Joe Wilder passed away in 2003.

  • Thomas J. Postel
    1986

    Thomas J. Postel

    C.W. Post University

    Thomas J. Postel

    C.W. Post University

    Postel began his lacrosse career at H. Frank Carey High School in New York, where he played varsity lacrosse from 1959-1962. At C.W. Post College, Postel had a brilliant lacrosse career, playing varsity from 1963-1965 and leading the Pioneers to the Lydecker Championship during those years. As an attackman for the Pioneers, Postel led the nation in scoring in 1963. In 1964, he earned honorable mention All-America honors for the attack position and was second in the nation in scoring. In 1965, Postel switched to the midfield and again led the nation in scoring, earning third team All-America honors as a midfielder. Postel captained the team in 1964 and 1965 and was selected as C.W. Post's team MVP in both seasons.Postel began playing for the Long Island Lacrosse Club in 1966, served in Vietnam from 1967-69, then returned home to continue playing for Long Island until 1985. He was the team captain for eight years and chosen club MVP three times. He was selected to the U.S. Club All-Star team 11 times and received the national Club Advocate MVP Award in 1966 and 1970.Postel played for the U.S. Team in the 1974 and 1978 Lacrosse World Championships, and was one of three team captains in 1978. He also has the unusual distinction of being selected for two positions on the U.S. Team - in 1974 as a midfielder and in 1978 as an attackman. He was the assistant coach for the U.S. Team at the 1986 World Championships.Postel began his coaching career at Manhasset High School in 1969. He was honored as Nassau County's High School Coach of the Year in 1973 and 1974. He left Manhasset in 1975 to become the head coach at Suffolk Community College for five years. In 1978, he was selected National Junior College Coach of the Year. He was the head coach at his alma mater, C.W. Post College from 1987 through 2006, compiling a record of 140 wins, 119 losses. He coached C. W. Post to a Division II national championship in 1996.

  • Peter B. Cramblet
    1986

    Peter B. Cramblet

    United States Military Academy

    Peter B. Cramblet

    United States Military Academy

    Peter Cramblet began his lacrosse career at Huntington High School on Long Island in 1963. His team won the Long Island Championship in 1965 and Suffolk County Championship in 1966. Cramblet was selected as a First-Team All-County for the attack position in 1966. Cramblet attended the United States Military Academy in 1967 where he was required to play on the freshman lacrosse team. In 1968, Cramblet's first year of varsity play for Army, he earned first team All-American honors as an attackman. Cramblet received first team All-American honors again in 1969 and 1970, and was a member of Army's 1969 national championship team. He represented Army in the 1970 North/South Collegiate All-Star game. In 1970, Cramblet was the recipient of the Turnbull Trophy as the nation's outstanding attackman and the coveted Enners Award as the outstanding collegiate lacrosse player in the country.Cramblet continued his post-collegiate lacrosse career for 20 years, playing for the Mt. Washington, Monterey, Potomac, Duwamish, and Redhook (Seattle) Lacrosse Clubs. After an Army career, Colonel Cramblet retired from active service in 1999 and began coaching youth and high school lacrosse.

  • Joseph W. Corcoran
    1986

    Joseph W. Corcoran

    Ithaca College

    Joseph W. Corcoran

    Ithaca College

    Corcoran began his lacrosse career at Geneva High as a four year varsity midfielder from 1937-1941. As team captain in 1941, he led Geneva to the Central New York League Championship. While serving in WWII from 1942-45, Corcoran won the light heavyweight boxing championship. From 1946-50 at Ithaca College, he initiated the lacrosse program, was the head coach as well as a four year varsity player. During that time, he also played box lacrosse for the North American League , was the football team captain and acheived Little All-American and All-Upstate NY football honors.In 1956, Corcoran returned to Geneva High to restart and become head coach of the lacrosse program. In 1967, he initiated lacrosse at Corning East High and as the head coach, won league championships in 1968-69, regional championships from 1971-73, and sectional championships in 1975, '77, '79, '80, and '81. His overall record at Corning East was 206 wins and 36 losses. In 1978, Corcoran was elected to the Ithaca College Hall of Fame. His coaching honors include seven "Coach of the Year" Awards, seven honor awards and the twin tiers "Team of the Decade" Award (Corning East) from 1970-80. In 1981, he received the Hero's Howard E. Johnson Award for the "man who has done the most for lacrosse" and in 1983, Corcoran joined the USLCA's "Two Hundred Club" for head coaches who have won 200 or more games. In 1990, he was inducted into the US Lacosse Upstate New York Chapter Hall of Fame, and in 1992, into the Geneva Sports Hall of Fame. Joe Corcoran passed away in 1997.

  • Joseph W. Cowan
    1985

    Joseph W. Cowan

    Johns Hopkins University

    Joseph W. Cowan

    Johns Hopkins University

    Cowan's long-time association with lacrosse began at Friends' School in Baltimore, where he was a standout midfielder. In 1963, he helped the team win the Maryland Scholastic Association Championship. He remained in Baltimore for his collegiate career at Johns Hopkins, and played on three consecutive championship teams from 1967-1969. Cowan earned first team All-America honors each of those three years, and in both 1968 and 1969 received the prestigious Turnbull Award as the nation's outstanding attackman. In 1969, he was also the first recipient of the Enners Award given to the nation's outstanding player. He was selected to play in the annual North/South game in 1969. He continued at Hopkins for 14 years as an assistant coach, and played for Mt. Washington Lacrosse Club in 1970-71. Cowan also served on the Board of Directors of the Lacrosse Foundation.

  • Richard F. Garber
    1985

    Richard F. Garber

    Springfield College

    Richard F. Garber

    Springfield College

    Garber enrolled at Springfield as a three-sport athlete in the football, basketball, and baseball, but found himself in reserve positions behind older students who were veterans returning from WWII. After basektball season as a sophomore Garber laid down his bat, picked up a lacrosse stick and played in the first game he ever saw. As a junior, he played football and lacrosse. Playing only lacrosse his last year, Garber captained the team and earned All-New England status. After a three-year stint in the Air Force and a year in YMCA work, Garber became the varsity lacrosse coach at UMass-Amherst, a position he retired from in 1990. His overall coaching record was 300-142. He was the first collegiate lacrosse coach to win 300 games. Seventeen of his teams ranked in the top 15 nationally with a highest ranking of fourth. Since 1976, nine of Garber's squads appeared in the NCAA Tournament. His teams have won 13 New England Championships. Twice Garber was selected as the Coach of the North teams in the Intercollegiate North/South Games. His North teams won both times. More than 100 of Garber's athletes attained All-New England status. Forty-two were selected to play in North/South All Star Games. Eighty-two of his players received All-American honors. Garber coached three men who played in the Federation of International Lacrosse World Championships; one was named Best and Fairest Player. Garber taught physical education and in 1969 was presented with the Distinguished Teacher Award by UMass-Amherst. 

    Over the years, Garber conducted numerous workshops in coaching, officiating, and youth lacrosse. As a result of his efforts, 15 of his players were employed by schools in New England as teachers or coaches and started lacrosse programs. Over 40 athletes became lacrosse officials and formed the nucleus of the New England Lacrosse Officials Association. Garber has also contributed to athletics through involvement in several professional organizations. He served a four-year term as president of the New England Intercollegiate Lacrosse Association. He was chief administrator of the North/South Intercollegiate Lacrosse Game. He spent 10 years as an Executive Board Member of the U.S. Intercollegiate Lacrosse Association (USILA), chairing its Film and Game Promotion Committee. A member of the committee to establish the FIL World Championship, he served on the committee to transform the USILA championships to an NCAA tournament.Garber was New England Coach of the Year nine times and College Lacrosse Coach of the year twice. He was inducted into the National Lacrosse Hall of Fame in 1985 and has received Division I NCAA Coach of the Year Honors. Upon his retirement in 1990, Garber was named Man of the Year by the USILA and received an honorary Doctor of Laws degree by UMass. He is the only coach to receive such an honorary degree. Garber passed away in 1994.

  • John W. Simmons
    1985

    John W. Simmons

    University of Maryland

    John W. Simmons

    University of Maryland

    Born in Annapolis, Simmons attended public schools there and later attended the University of Maryland, where he was a starting defenseman for four years on the lacrosse team. Simmons helped Maryland to 23 straight wins and two undefeated national collegiate championships (1955 and 1956) during his four-year career, earning first team All-America honors in those two title seasons. In 1956, he was a member of the victorious South All-Star Team. Simmons also won the Powell Award for Service and Advancement of Lacrosse at Maryland and the William C. Schmeisser Memorial Trophy as the nation's outstanding defenseman in 1956. After graduating with a degree in accounting, Simmons was drafted into the Army and served in Hawaii. After military service, he worked for an accounting firm in Washington, and from 1965 to 1970 he was the comptroller for Anne Arundel County government. From 1970 until his retirement in 2001, he owned private certified public accountant firms in Annapolis. Simmons also continued to play and coach lacrosse after college. He played from 1959 to 1962 on the Annapolis Lacrosse Club, where he made the club all-star team in 1960 and 1961. He also coached youth lacrosse in Annapolis for several years. Simmons was inducted to the University of Maryland's Athletics Hall of Fame in 1989, and he was one of 19 Terrapins named to the ACC's 50th Anniversary Team in 2002. John Simmons passed away from Lou Gehrig's disease in 2003.

  • Howard J. Krongard
    1985

    Howard J. Krongard

    Princeton University

    Howard J. Krongard

    Princeton University

    Howard "Cookie" Krongard played on Princeton's undefeated Ivy League championship teams from 1959-1961 and earned first team All-American honors in 1961. Krongard also was a first team All-Ivy selection his last two years at Princeton. His extensive club lacrosse career began with the Boston Club in 1962 and continued with four other teams, including seven years with the New York Club. In 1964-65, Krongard played goal for Cambridge University in England, winners of the English Universities Championship. He was voted to the USCLA All-Star Team eight times, and in both 1968 and 1974 was selected as the USCLA's Player of the Year. Krongard was vice president of the USCLA in 1969-70, and director of the Lacrosse Foundation from 1982-84. In 1983, he was voted USILA Man of the Year, and in 1995, he was inducted into the New York Sports Hall of Fame.

  • Benjamin H. Kaestner
    1985

    Benjamin H. Kaestner

    Johns Hopkins University

    Benjamin H. Kaestner

    Johns Hopkins University

    Kaestner was selected as a first team All-American in 1966 and 1967. In those seasons, Kaestner became the first player to win the Schmeisser Award as the nation's top defenseman two consecutive years. He was a member of the Senior All-Star Team in 1967 when Hopkins tied for the top spot in the country. Kaestner received the Sports Illustrated Award of Merit for accomplishments in his senior year and was selected to the Hopkins' All-Time team. In 1968 and 1969, Kaestner won championships with the Long Island Lacrosse Club, and was a member of the Mt. Washington Club from 1970-1974. Kaestner also served as an assistant coach at the U.S. Military Academy (West Point) in 1968-69. Kaestner joins his father, Bud, as one of the few father-son combinations in the Hall of Fame.