• Victor Starzenski
    1959

    Victor Starzenski

    Stevens Institute of Technology

    Victor Starzenski

    Stevens Institute of Technology

    Starzenski was born in 1886 in Clayton, Kansas and he was educated at Hoboken Academy in New Jersey before moving on to Stevens Institute of Technology, where he graduated in 1907 with a degree in mechanical engineering. While at Stevens, Vic played on their team from 1903 to 1907, receiving letters and doing an outstanding job. After graduating from Stevens, Vic had many interesting jobs including field engineer for Westinghouse, general superintendent of the gas department of Adirondacks Power Corp., general manager of the Schenectady Power Company, and finally, vice president and general manager of the Hudson Valley Fuel Corporation from 1936 until his retirement in 1945. Besides his regular business activities, Vic was very active in the Chamber of Commerce of Schenectady and was on the original organizing board for the Schenectady Boy Scouts of America. He was a very active member in the Unitarian Church of his community. His military service saw him as a first lieutenant in the Chemical Warfare Service during World War I.Vic's coaching experience started at Union College, where he coached from 1922-28. He then coached at R.P.I. in 1944 and 1945 and at the University of New Mexico in 1946, returning to Union where he finished his coaching career from 1948-50. It is very interesting to note that Vic started lacrosse in all three of the above mentioned colleges. On the side, Vic found time to do quite a bit of officiating from 1923-1950 and served a term on the USILA's rules committee. He is the author of a very fine article on lacrosse, published in "The Stevens Indicator." In 1947, Starzenski was awarded the certificate by the US Intercollegiate Lacrosse Association for the man who had done most for lacrosse in that year. Vic Starzenski passed away in 1974.

  • 1959

    William A. Davis

    Woburn

    William A. Davis

    Woburn

    The following is an excerpt from an article by Craig E. Taylor entitled "He Saw Sports Come In" about William Davis. "Bill Davis was born in Woburn, Mass., in 1862. As a young boy, he joined the townsfolk in the pastime of running to fires, often several villages away. He built up wind and stamina in this manner, and it was a source of pride to be able to arrive first on the scene." A varied career took him through an almost countless number of jobs, including those of special agent of the United States Employment Service, field representative of the National Manufacturers Association, Secretary of the National Marble Dealers Association for many years and in between, service as a real estate salesman, sports writer, shoe dealers' representative and other posts. In 1884, Bill was touring the British Isles as a member of the All-American team. His memory up until the time of his death held every detail of that experience, as well as many others. He recalled seeing A.G. Spalding as a pitcher for Boston. He was the All Round Champion in Boston and won a medal for "General Excellence." Bill kept newspaper clippings of his and others successes, which, for him, were numerous. Throughout his life, Bill displayed an attitude and charisma about sports that lives on whenever anyone mentions his name. His accomplishments have served to enhance the game of lacrosse when it was still in its infancy, and now lacrosse is honored to pay him back.

  • Andrew M. Kirkpatrick
    1958

    Andrew M. Kirkpatrick

    St. John's College

    Andrew M. Kirkpatrick

    St. John's College

    Kirkpatrick was born in Granite, Maryland in 1901 and graduated from Baltimore City College in 1919. He received his BA degree from St. John's (Md.) College in 1923 and his LLB from the University of Baltimore in 1932. While at City College, he played lacrosse, track and football - gaining letters in all sports. Moving to St. Johns, he participated in both football and lacrosse and was captain of the football team, and an All-Maryland football player. After leaving St. John's, he played for the Mt. Washington Club in 1924, 1925 and 1928 and the L'Hirondelle Club in 1926-27, captaining their team in 1926. Andy's first job in athletic work after graduating from St. John's was to coach football at the Boys' Latin School from 1923-25. He then coached lacrosse at Baltimore City College from 1925-28, and then on to the Donaldson School where he coached lacrosse in 1929. Andy officiated at both lacrosse and football from 1927 through 1939 and was one of the leading officials in both sports. He was chief referee for the Maryland-Virginia district in 1943-49 and again from 1950-53. In 1954, he became commissioner of the Southern Officials Association. He also served on the All-American Selection Committee and was a past-president of the Baltimore Lacrosse League. Besides all of his work in the athletic field, Andy was a very excellent sports reporter for the Baltimore News Post from 1924-34, and was a columnist for the Sunday American from 1925-55. He also was state editor and news editor from 1934-52, and editor of the Baltimore Sunday American from 1952-55. In the many years that Andy was active in the lacrosse world, he published many articles on lacrosse, especially in the Lacrosse Guide, and after his untimely death, the 1956 Lacrosse Guide was dedicated to him. The Alumni Association of the Baltimore City College established a memorial trophy in his name. This trophy is one of the prized awards among the scholastic players in Baltimore. Andy Kirkpatrick passed away in 1955.

  • Ronald Abercrombie
    1958

    Ronald Abercrombie

    Johns Hopkins University

    Ronald Abercrombie

    Johns Hopkins University

    Abercrombie was educated at the public schools in Baltimore and entered Johns Hopkins University in the fall of 1897 after graduating from the Baltimore City College. He earned his AB degree from Johns Hopkins in 1901 and his M.D. degree in 1905. The first lacrosse game he ever played in was in 1896, between the Maryland Athletic Club and the Crescent Athletic Club. As a freshman at Hopkins in 1898, he played on the school's second championship team. He then served as captain on the championship teams in 1899 and 1900, and he also played on the 1902 championship team coached by William Schmeisser. Abercrombie was known throughout his career as one of the greatest centers of all-time, and was especially noted for his face-off ability. In addition to being both a coach and player at Hopkins, Abercrombie organized the first Mt. Washington team in 1904. He wrote the first illustrated article on how to play lacrosse, published in 1904 by the B. Appleton Company. He also edited Schmeisser's book entitled "How to Play Lacrosse." Abercrombie was also instrumental in introducing lacrosse at the Naval Academy. Abercrombie is credited with two other innovations in the game - the lacrosse net and the shorter handled stick used by atatckmen. Additionally, he was the first chairman of the National Intercollegiate Lacrosse Association, served as its president for two years, and was responsible for the revision of the rules in 1901. Dr. Abercrombie's records in medicine in the different hospitals in Baltimore, both as a teacher and as a physician, are legendary. His lacrosse accomplishments on and off the field were perhaps even greater. Dr. Abercrombie is a member of the all-time Johns Hopkins team. Dr. Abercrombie passed away in 1963.

  • Carlton P. Collins
    1958

    Carlton P. Collins

    Cornell University

    Carlton P. Collins

    Cornell University

    Carlton P. Collins, or Collie, attended Boys High School in Brooklyn, New York, from 1908 to 1911. He was an active member of both the football and lacrosse teams, the latter of which won the PSAL championship in New York City. Collie graduated from St. Paul's School in Garden City in 1911 where he played on an undefeated football team and would have played lacrosse had there been an organized team. Collie ventured to Cornell University in 1912, where he captained the freshman football team to an undefeated season. With no freshman lacrosse available, Collie had to wait until his sophmore year to earn a letter in lacrosse. He acheived letters in both football and lacrosse in 1914 and 1915. In 1914 and 1916, the lacrosse team won the Northern Division championship, with Collie being the captain of the 1916 team. In 1915, the football team won the National Collegiate championship. After graduating, Collie joined the Crescent Athletic Club Lacrosse team in Brooklyn. He was recognized as one of the most talented lacrosse players of his day and played for the Crescents from 1920-1929. He began officiating in 1922, and did not hang up his whistle until 1942. In 1932, he organized, financed and coached the lacrosse team at Stamford (Conn.) High School. He became president of the United States Intercollegiate Lacrosse Association in 1925 and remained on the executive committee until 1928. It was in the year that Collie was made chairman of the Rules Committee, where he remained until 1941. During his term as chairman, many drastic rule changes were made, including reducing the number of players on each team from 12 to 10. Collie's loyalty and dedication for the sport of lacrosse is unique in that it spans five decades as a player, coach, official, founder, president and committee chairman of the USILA.

  • Albert A. Brisotti
    1958

    Albert A. Brisotti

    New York University

    Albert A. Brisotti

    New York University

    Born in New York City in 1888, Brisotti graduated from the Towsend Harris Hall in 1906. He took his undergraduate work at the City College of New York and the Engineering School at New York University, 1908-1911, and later took graduate courses in the New York University School of Education. While in high school, Brisotti played football, lacrosse, and ran on the track team, winning awards in all sports. In college, he continued his work in football, track, and lacrosse, winning many awards during his college days. After leaving college, Brisotti played on several different club teams scattered throughout the New York area and continued playing until the 1942 season. He coached at the following institutions: Stevens Institute, 1918-1920, at which time Stevens was twice the Northern Champion. He moved to Rutgers University in 1921 and was their first coach of lacrosse and coached there through 1925. Then to New York University where he coached from 1926-1933. Then out of college coaching for fifteen years, but very active in coaching the different boys' clubs in the New York area, and in the box lacrosse leagues that were active during this period of time. Back into college coaching in 1949, he was the first coach at Hofstra College and in the same year, he became the first coach at Post College.

    Brisotti's officiating history included 26 years, from 1926-1951. He was also extremely active writing articles and lecturing on the game throughout his entire career. In 1934, Al was one of the founders of the Long Island Lacrosse Association and president of this group from 1935-1953. Also, a founder and past president of the Metropolitan Sunday Lacrosse League. He is well noted for being editor of the Lacrosse Guide for over two decades. Besides all of Al's work in the sports field, he was extremely active working for the New York Central Railroad, the New York State Public Service and the New York City Fire Department before moving into the educational field in 1925, where he was extremely active as a teacher and administrator and Dean of Boys until his retirement in 1958. Al Brisotti, Sr. passed away in 1964.

  • Laurie D. Cox
    1957

    Laurie D. Cox

    Harvard University

    Laurie D. Cox

    Harvard University

    Cox was born in 1883 in Londonderry, Nova Scotia, and graduated from Bellows Falls High School in Vermont in 1900. He attended Acadia University, earning an AB Degree in 1903, and then graduated Harvard University with an SB Degree in Landscape Architecture in 1908. While at Harvard, Laurie played goalie for the freshman team in 1905 and the varsity lacrosse team in 1906-08, winning varsity letters in '07 and '08. Harvard won the title of the Northern Division of the Old Lacrosse League in 1908 after beating Cornell in a game which went to seven overtime periods. Laurie played goal, point, second defense and second attack during his playing days and was known as a great stick handler. While playing lacrosse at Harvard his senior year Laurie was also manager of the team and even at that early date showed his great promotional possibilities by working on other schools to start lacrosse. He finally arranged a game with Navy in 1908, which Harvard won 4-1. Laurie introduced the game to Syracuse University in 1916 and coached its informal teams in 1916-17, then in 1918 lacrosse was made a minor sport at Syracuse and a major sport in 1920. Laurie continued as head coach until 1931. He was also coach of the All-American teams in International Series in 1930-35-37. During his career as head coach at Syracuse his team compiled undefeated records in 1922 and 1924 and was USILA champion or co-champion in 1920, 1922, 1924 and 1925.

    In 1948, Laurie introduced lacrosse to New England College, where he was president and coached their team in 1948-49-50. He left there and upon returning in 1954 coached again in '54-'56-'57. His overall record including Syracuse, New England, and International series read as follows: 189 wins, 65 loses, and 5 ties. Besides Laurie's great coaching career some of his other contributiions to lacrosse have been: officiating many games in his early days, member of the first Rules Committee set up in 1922 and continued on same until 1929, Chairman of International Committee 1922-26-30. Selected All-American Team in 1922 and continued to do so designing and furnishing the certificates until the first official All-American Committee was set up in 1933, on which he served as chairman for many years. He was one of the leading landscape architects in the country, and was professor of landscape engineering and head of the department at Syracuse University from 1915-1947. From 1947-1950 and again from 1952-1956, he was president of New England College. He was a Fellow of the American Institute of Parks and an executive and a life member of the board of directors of the National Conference on State Parks. Laurie Cox passed away in 1968.

  • William C. Schmeisser
    1957

    William C. Schmeisser

    Johns Hopkins University

    William C. Schmeisser

    Johns Hopkins University

    Schmeisser, know as "Father Bill" to Hopkins lacrossemen, was born in Baltimore in 1880. He graduated from Baltimore City College in 1899 and received his BA degree from Johns Hopkins University in 1902. While a student at Johns Hopkins from 1900-1902, Schmeisser played on the lacrosse team, and in 1902 captained the national collegiate championship team. He played one more year of lacrosse in 1905, when he returned to the university to do graduate work. Following his graduation from law school, Schmeisser became actively interested in the coaching of lacrosse and began by serving as the coach of the Hopkins varsity team. He was also instrumental in the early organization of the Mt. Washington Club team. In 1904 he wrote a book on the coaching of lacrosse, which was the standard textbook for coaches for some 50 years. Schmeisser's interest in coaching lasted until his death in 1941, and throughout the entire time he never received any financial compensation for his work. He worked with the Hopkins varsity during his entire adult life, and helped to introduce lacrosse to many schools, including the U.S. Naval Academy and the University of Maryland. He was with the Johns Hopkins team of 1928 that represented the United States in the Amsterdam Olympics, and he accompanied an all-star team to England in 1937. He was a long-time participant in the affairs of the United States Intercollegiate Lacrosse Association, serving at various times on the rules committee, as chief referee and as president. Outside of lacrosse, Schmeisser was very active in civic affairs, and served as a member of the board of directors on the Baltimore Branch of the YMCA for 16 years and was president from 1938-41. Schmeisser also prospered in his own law firm and became a member of the American, Maryland and Baltimore Bar Associations.

  • Roy Taylor
    1957

    Roy Taylor

    Cornell University

    Roy Taylor

    Cornell University

    Taylor was born in 1887 in Brooklyn, New York and graduated from Pratt Institute High School in Brooklyn. He graduated with a civil engineering degree from Cornell University in 1910. While at Cornell, he played freshman lacrosse in 1907 and was a varsity lacrosse letterman in 1908, 1909 and 1910. Cornell tied for the lacrosse championship in 1910. Lacrosse was a minor sport then at Cornell but Roy was awarded a varsity letter at the end of his senior year for his outstanding play and leadership. Taylor also played freshman basketball, and was captain of the civil engineering team. After leaving Cornell, Taylor played for the Crescent Athletic Club from 1910 through 1925 and was captain in 1920-21 during which time the Crescents won the mythical championships - in games played against Illinois A.C. in Chicago before 20,000 fans. Taylor played both midfield and close attack. Taylor's lacrosse life was interrupted during the first World War when he went to France and served as Chief of Tounage Sec., G.I. General Staff, Tours, France and reached the rank of Major of Engineers in the U.S. Army before discharge. During his Army career he was awarded the Legion of Honor Medal, the most coveted France decoration. Taylor helped coach and start the sport at the Montclair A.C. and at West Point and was fundamental in helping to start lacrosse at Yale University. Taylor started officiating lacrosse when Father Bill Schmeisser appointed officials, and officiated for many years. He was named chief referee in 1925, a position he held for 20 years. Roy spoke on lacrosse at the Wingate Memorial lectures given to the PSAL coaches in New York in 1928-29-30. These lectures were later published under the title "Talks by Great Coaches," which included all sports.

    He was secretary, treasurer, vice-president and the president of the USILA and later chairman of the rules committee for many years. He served on the USILA's executive board for 30 years, served on the American Olympic Committee in 1932 and was a leader in developing the USILA into the body it is today. Besides outstanding achievement in lacrosse, he had a most interesting and successful business life. Starting with Ontario Power Co., he advanced to assistant hydraulic engineer before leaving in 1915 to join the Munson Steamship line. His work at Munson was interrupted by the war, but upon his return from France, Taylor became assistant to the president of Munson Lines, vice-president of the Munson Building Corp., and vice-president of the Bahamas Hotel Corp., a position he held until the Munson Line was liquidated in 1940. Roy then joined the Gulf Oil Corp., and remained there until retiring in 1953. Roy Taylor passed away in 1963.

  • Cyrus C. Miller
    1957

    Cyrus C. Miller

    New York University

    Cyrus C. Miller

    New York University

    Miller attended New York University, where he received his Bachelor of Arts degree in 1888. After attending Columbia University, he earned his Law Degree in 1891. He played lacrosse at New York University and also captained the team when he was an undergraduate there. Cy continued to play the game with the Staten Island Athletic Club Lacrosse team, which he captained to the 1890 championship. From 1895 to 1912, Cy played for the Crescent Athletic Club. Miller held the office of president of the Professional Lacrosse Association. He also was a member of the original Real Estate Board dealing with the extension of the New York Subway System, and a founder of the New York Real Securities Exchange. In 1917 he was appointed a member of the New York State and United States Food Administration Board. Cy was the president of the Boro of Bronx, New York City from 1910 to 1914, as well as being a trustee of New York University. Cy served as an active member of the Executive Committee of the United States Intercollegiate Lacrosse Association for many years. Cy Miller passed away in 1956.

  • 1957

    Charles E. Marsters

    Harvard University

    Charles E. Marsters

    Harvard University

    Charles Marsters graduated from Polytechnic Preparatory School in New York City in 1902, where he played basketball and ran track. He graduated from Harvard with a Bachelor of Science degree in 1907. He played one year of freshman lacrosse and three years of varsity lacrosse, and was captain for one year. In his sophomore year, he was elected to the Ivy Club, and was elected president of the club in his senior year. In 1913, he helped to create the Boston Lacrosse Club for the purpose of spreading the game throughout all of New England. For sixteen years, he played point and managed the team. After that period, Charlie coached the team for a number of years, also filling in as advisory coach and club president. During World War I, Charlie enlisted in the Navy, and after attending officers' training school, was commissioned ensign and stationed at the Naval Flying Station at Pensacola, Florida. During the years 1926 to 1930, his efforts with student groups and athletic directors resulted in the following institutions fielding teams: Brown, M.I.T., Tufts, and New Hampshire. In 1935, he helped form the New England Lacrosse League. For many years, Charlie wrote the New England College article for the NCAA Annual Lacrosse Guide. He held many offices in the USILA, including president (1909-1910, 1917-1918) and vice president (1907-1908). He served on the All-American committee for ten years, and in 1951 he received the USILA's Man of the Year Award, recognizing outstanding contribution to the game with unselfish and untiring devotion. Charlie Marsters passed away in 1962.